Milestones – Day 1400

Milestone days generally lead to blog posts. I’ve been absent from the blog for too long, and I’m getting a jump on 2017’s goals by writing today. img_3949

On Dec. 16th, 2016, my running streak hit day 1400. Some days are easier than others, and I’ve looked forward to this day for a long time. I don’t believe it’s a coincidence that today’s run coincided with the 1-year anniversary of a new adventure.  and I’ve been blessed with good health and freedom from injuries. In addition, I’ve been blessed with a wife that allows me to continue a daily endeavor that could be diagnosed as obsessive-compulsive.

Over the last 1400 days I’ve been blessed with good health and freedom from injuries. In addition, I’ve been blessed with a wife that allows me to continue a daily endeavor that could be diagnosed as obsessive-compulsive.

Some runs are for learning and listening to podcasts to maximize my time. And some runs are just me and a lonely road at 5 a.m. In the silence, there is room for reflection and prayer. This milestone run was a time to look back at the journey over the last year and to see God’s guidance along the way.

As I look back on the past year, I’ve seen God work in my life in ways I could never imagine. From losing a job to starting over, the last 365 days have had their ups and downs. When I started this streak on Feb. 13th, 2013, I think God knew that this is what I’d need to help get me through a tough year. Friday’s 7 miles gave me the opportunity to look back at the last year and look forward to the future.

In 2017, I’m looking forward to documenting more and sharing the lessons I’ve learned from running and trying to be intentional in life. Watch for more posts on the blog, and I hope I can bring value, encouragement, and inspiration to all who reay. See you down the road…

 

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12 Reflections on 1200 Straight Days of Running

IMG_3328It started off as an ordinary February day. To be honest, I don’t remember much about the day itself, but looking back now I wish I’d paid more attention. On a typical week, I’d hit lift weights at the YMCA and find time to run 2-3 times during the week. This day was like most Friday’s, but 3 years later, Feb. 15th, 2013 is the day this whole madness started.

Today marks day 1,200 of my Running Streak – meaning I’ve run every day for the last 3+ years (minimum of 2 miles). I never planned this; it just sort of happened. I guess I thought I’d try to run every day for a week. That week turned into 2, then 3, and before I knew it, I was approaching 100 days of running.

So here we are 171 weeks later still going at it, and not knowing how to quit. Looking back, here are 12 takeaways from the last 1200 days.

  1. You have to be intentional.
  2. Some days are easier than others.
  3. The best way to run in the morning is to set out your clothes the night before.
  4. My wife deserves 95% of the credit (She’s a saint!).
  5. Habits – good and bad – are hard to break
  6. Cruise ships are much more fun to run around than hotel parking lots.
  7. Texas summers are miserable.
  8. I’m a much more pleasant person when I run in the morning.
  9. “What we’re doing here is not a mark of intelligence.”- Jon Simpson
  10. I’m very thankful for hotel treadmills.
  11. My dad is my hero – at age 73, he’s averaged 3 miles a day for the last 365+ days.
  12. Set goals and celebrate milestones.

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    Lily deserves a gold star for joining me on most early morning. 

It’s not an exhaustive list, but it’s a quick snapshot of observations over the last 3 years. I never set out to take on such an endeavor, but now that I’m here, I suppose we’ll keep going.

Over the next 100 days, I’ll probably complain about the heat and humidity of Texas summers for 90 of them. And for the other 10, I’ll most likely be on a treadmill somewhere.

So bear with me as my twitter feed is 90% running, and the next time you see my wife, make sure to congratulate her for enduring and supporting such nonsense.

Happy Streaking!

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The Middle – A fog between start and finish

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10×10 Challenge – Day 7 Days 4-7 are usually the toughest.

Yesterday was day 7 of my latest 10×10 challenge. For those of you that don’t know, this running challenge involves running 10 miles a day for 10 straight days. That’s 100 miles over a week and a half. I’ve done 2 of these over the past 2 years, and I thought this was a time in my life that I could go at this again.

I’ve learned a lot over the course of these 10×10 challenges – I’ve worked through personal struggles, job challenges, goals, and a myriad of other thoughts. With today’s post, I want to focus on the middle miles (days 4-7) and how those relate to life.

Why is the middle hard?

For me personally, the first days and the last days are easier than the middle. When I set goals, the start is easy. I can get up at 4:15 a.m. on days 1 and 2.When I hit days 8-10, I can see the finish line, and it’s easier to get out of bed and hit the road.

The challenge usually comes in the murky middle. For me, running 10 miles on days 4-7 is tough. I’m tired. I know I have another week of this madness. I realized that when we set goals and start working towards them, this MIDDLE is the hardest part of accomplishing anything worthwhile.

How do we fight through after the newness wares off?

How do we stay focused on the goal and take concrete steps when the end seems so far away (or maybe nowhere in sight)?

I realized a couple of things during miles 40-70 of the current challenge.

The middle is necessary to get to the end. 

Anything worthwhile has a middle.

The middle is necessary to accomplish anything of substance.

If you go from start to finish with no middle, you may not appreciate what you accomplish.

Right now, I’m in a season that I would call a MIDDLE. My job ended in December and my new adventure starts at the end of the month (February). The middle has been a place of unknown and a wavering between hope and fear.

The lessons I’ve learned about the middle are real. It’s not easy making it through the middle to the place where you can catch a glimpse of the finish line. And many times it is faith and grit that gets us to a place where we can know the end is within our reach.

For me, the end is now in sight. I can see the finish line, and I know I can make it 2 more days – 20 more miles. If you are currently in the middle – between your start and your finish – keep moving forward. Keep your eyes on the goal, and remember that the MIDDLE is what makes the END worth the fight.

 

 

1095 Days and Counting

8F661017-9499-4A82-B2C7-F20D961072EEThere are some things that I’m pretty good at doing on a daily basis:

  • Eating
  • Checking twitter
  • Looking at my phone
  • Eating sweets
  • Checking Facebook
  • Late-night snacking

I’m pretty solid as eating, but as you can see, running did not make the list of things that comes easy for me on a daily basis.

Some folks eat so that they can run, I, however, run so that I am can eat (and I do that very well).

On Saturday, February 16th, 2013, I started on a goal to run at least 2 miles every single day for 1 week. Little did I know that that 1 week would turn into 2, and then into a month…and then a year. 1095 days later and the running streak (#RunStreak) is alive and well. Today starts my 4th year of running every, single day.

Over the last 3 years, I’ve seen a lot of early miles and a few later in the day. My wife, Chelsea, deserves most of the credit as she has put up with my absurd idiosyncrasy. She tolerates my leaving right before dinner or after work to squeeze in a quick run if I’m not able to get it in during the early morning hours.

For the last 60 days, I’ve been joined by our puppy Lily. She’s been a trooper, and we’ve averaged 4-5 miles a day. Today she put in her longest run – 10 miles as I’ve kicked off another round of 10×10 (running 10 miles a day for 10 straight days).

It’s been said that what we are doing here (Running Streak) is not a mark of intelligence, and that is probably true. It is however, a sign of perseverance (and probably a hint of stubbornness – a quality my wife would attest to).

I’ve run at 4 a.m. and 10 p.m. My job requires travel so I’ve had to think strategically to plan my runs. Some are on a treadmill, but most are on the road. I’ve run in Vegas, Albuquerque, Jackson (MS), El Paso, Dallas, Houston, Austin, New Orleans, San Antonio, and many other cities. Some runs have been hot and some have been cold, but most have one thing in common – you have to be intentional in order for it to happen.

Two months ago I lost my job. It was quite a shock, but these daily runs have been therapeutic and helped me work through my emotions. We’ve read the research on how exercise gives us a boost and helps us physiologically and psychologically, but it’s not easy to hit the road in the middle of a struggle. My RunStreak has helped me heal and allowed me to look forward to the possibilities of a new adventure.

As you think about your daily endeavors, what’s one thing that you’d like to do every single day? Exercise. Reading. Prayer. Find an area and challenge yourself to do it every day for a week. Who knows exactly what your 1 week might turn into…